Attorney General

The Attorney General is the state’s chief law enforcement officer and serves as the head of the state Department of Justice. The Attorney General represents North Carolina in legal matters. The Attorney General’s office advocates in court for the people in areas like civil rights, consumer protection, and the environment.

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There are 4 primary candidates for the office of North Carolina Governor. There are 3 Republican candidates, and 1 Democratic candidate.  The candidates are as follows:

Jim O’Neill (R)
Josh Stein (D)
Sam Hayes (R)
Christine Mumma (R)
 
Two candidates, Sam Hayes (R) and Jim O’Neill (R), did not respond to our survey, so you will not see them mentioned below.

All answers are provided in text and audio files for each candidate. To navigate through the questions you may either scroll through this page to read or listen to their answers, or use the links below to jump directly to specific questions.

The primary candidates for the office of North Carolina Attorney General were each asked the following questions:

The complete audio of all responses for the Attorney General’s race:

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Question 1: What are your top three priorities?

Christine Mumma (R)

Justice efficiency, access, equality, and reliability

Accountability of all government agencies to North Carolina citizens

Scientific independence and accuracy of the State Crime Lab

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Josh Stein (D)

As Attorney General, my top priorities have included combating the opioid crisis, protecting consumers, and keeping our people safe. I look forward to continuing this work in my next term as AG.

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Question 2: What efforts would be made in your office in supporting other law enforcement agencies, to ensure that victims and witnesses with disabilities are appropriately supported in accessing the justice process, specifically in testifying in court and being considered a reliable witness?

Christine Mumma (R)

Every person should have equal access to justice, as a victim, a defendant, or a witness. Regardless of what role a person with disabilities is in, they should receive assistance to access the courts and to be treated equally and fairly under the law. If a person’s disability could impact a juror’s perception, specific jury instructions should be given and the party calling the witness should be required to address any environmental or logistical concerns.

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Josh Stein (D)

As AG, my office hired a victim-witness coordinator to work with individuals in preparation for trials. This coordinator works to provide any needed accommodations an individual may require due to a disability. In addition, my office supervises the Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Division, which sets requirements for basic law enforcement training, as well as the North Carolina Justice Academy, which provides that training. As AG, I have encouraged both institutions to reject stereotypes.

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Question 3: How will you ensure that victims are able to  pursue justice when individual prosecutors may discount their complaints because of their mental health, developmental, or other disabilities?

Christine Mumma (R)

If needed, victims with disabilities should be given guardian ad litem assistance, and if they are discriminated against because of their disability, including having their complaints discounted, the prosecutor should be reported to the State Bar by the guardian.

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Josh Stein (D)

As Attorney General, my office includes Special Prosecutions lawyers, who work with and often take over cases from local prosecutors. These attorneys work hard so that all North Carolinians are able to pursue justice, regardless of their mental health or disability. We also participate in training prosecutors across the state and encourage them not to stereotype.

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Question 4: What should be required in SRO training to ensure that students with disabilities remain safe?

Christine Mumma (R)

This seems like a common sense question. SROs should be aware of any child in the environment where they work who has special needs of any kind. They should ensure they receive training to learn how to appropriately respond to any situation that threatens the safety of any child, and that training should include responses that may be unique to children under their watch who have disabilities.

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Josh Stein (D)

To ensure the safety of students with disabilities, I believe we must require training for all SRO’s to act with understanding and compassion. Learning how to deescalate situations is critical for SROs. In 2018, I successfully urged the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission to require thorough and comprehensive training of all SROs.

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