Learn about Voting in North Carolina Here!

Can I vote?

Knowing your rights is the first step in voting!

 

Check if you are eligible to vote

How to Vote

There are three ways to cast your vote!

Which way works best for you?

Can I vote?

Knowing your rights is the first step in voting!

You CAN vote even if you have a guardian!

You CAN vote even if you have a felony conviction, as long as you have served your time and finished any probation or parole. However, you will have to register to vote again.

You DO NOT need a photo ID to vote! The courts overturned North Carolina's voter ID law. Sign up for Election Alerts so we can let you know about changes to North Carolina's voting laws.

Checklist for registering for and voting:

Question 1:

Are you a U.S. citizen?

If Yes, great!

If No, you can't vote.

Don't know? Learn about citizenship from U.S. Citizenship and Enforcement Services.


Question 2:

Will you be at least 18 years old on Election Day?

If Yes, great!

If No, you can't vote this time. However, you can pre-register to vote if you are at least 16 years old.

Don't know? Look at your birth certificate. Your birthday also might be on an ID card or on official paperwork. Ask someone you know and trust for help.


Question three:

Are you a resident of North Carolina?

If Yes, great!

If No, you can't vote in North Carolina.

Don't know? You are a resident of North Carolina if you mostly live here and not in another state.


Question 4:

Have you moved recently?

If yes, did you move into a new county?

Will you have lived in the same county you are voting in for at least 30 days before the election?

Example: You live in Mecklenburg County and you plan to vote in Mecklenburg County.

If Yes, great!

If No, but you answered "Yes" to all of the other questions, you can still vote! You just have to vote in your old county.


Question 5:

Am you registered to vote?

If Yes, great!

If No, get registered!

Don't know? Look yourself up on the NC State Board of Elections website.


If you answered "Yes" to all of the above questions, CONGRATULATIONS! 
You can vote in the upcoming election. 

 

Learn how/where to vote!

The word "Vote" handwritten on a chalkboard with vintage American flag.

There are three ways to vote in North Carolina.

From Home

In Person

In a Facility

Vote From Home

Step 1: Get a Ballot

Step 2: Vote!

If your home is a facility, please visit our Vote from a Facility.  Residential facility includes, nursing homes, rest homes, adult care homes, and psychiatric facilities.

In order to vote from home, you will have to use an absentee ballot.

 

Vote from Home Part 1: Steps to Get Your Absentee Ballot

Step 1:

Decide who will request your absentee ballot.

You can request an absentee ballot. You also have the right to have a close family member or your legal guardian request an absentee ballot for you. If there is not a close family member or guardian who can assist you, almost anyone can help you request an absentee ballot.


Step 2:

Get an absentee ballot request form.

Your absentee ballot request form cannot be filled out entirely online. If you are not able to download and print the form, you must call the NC Board of Elections or your local County Board of Elections to get one.


Step 3:

Fill out and sign the absentee ballot request form.

  • Fill it out yourself or ask someone you trust to help you. A close family member or your legal guardian also can fill out this form to request an absentee ballot for you.
  • Even if you download the form and fill it out on the computer, you still need to print it so you can sign it!

Step 4: 

Return the absentee ballot request form.

  • For most people, your absentee ballot request form MUST be filled out and returned (not just mailed) by the Tuesday before the election at 5:00 p.m. You can return your absentee ballot request form by mail, fax, email, or in person to your local County Board of Elections office. If you plan to mail it in, make sure the form will arrive at the Board of Elections before the deadline!
  • If you miss this deadline but you cannot get to the polls because of a sickness or other disability, you may still be able to vote. You, a close family member, or your guardian will have to go, in person, to your local County Board of Elections to get an absentee ballot by the day before the election at 5:00 p.m.
To mail it in:
  • Find the mailing address of your local County Board of Elections.
  • Get an envelope and a stamp. Put your filled-out and signed absentee ballot request form in the envelope. On the front of the envelope, write the mailing address for your local County Board of Elections. Also, put the stamp in the upper right-hand corner of envelope. Put the envelope in the mail.
To email it in:
  • Find the email address for your local County Board of Elections.
  • Scan your filled-out and signed absentee ballot. Then send that scanned document as an attachment to the email address of your local County Board of Elections.
To return it in person:

Congratulations! You have just requested your absentee ballot!

You should get an absentee ballot in the mail shortly. If it does not come within a week, call your the NC Board of Elections or your local County Board of Elections. If they don't help you, report it!

Vote From Home Part 2: Cast Your Absentee Vote

First, you must be registered to vote. Once you have requested and received an absentee ballot, you are ready to vote from home.


Step 1: 

Be informed!


Step 2:

Get two witnesses. (You only need one if your witness is a notary public.)

  • Your witnesses can be friends, family, or someone else you know.
  • These witnesses will have to be "in your presence" while you fill out your ballot, but they are required by law to "respect the secrecy of the ballot and [your] privacy" while you fill out your ballot, unless you want their help.
  • Someone who helps you fill out your ballot can also be one of your witnesses.

Step 3:

Fill out your ballot.

  • Fill it out yourself or ask someone you trust to help you. Just about anyone can help you fill out your ballot, but ONLY YOU can decide who to vote for.

Step 4:

Seal the ballot in the return envelope that came with your ballot.


Step 5:

Complete the Absentee Application and Certificate on the back of the envelope.

  • Make sure you sign your ballot return envelope!
  • If someone helped you fill out your ballot, they also need to sign the envelope and add the date.

Step 6: 

Have your witnesses fill out the Witnesses’ Certification section.


Step 7:

Return your ballot to your local County Board of Elections.

  • You can mail in your ballot, but you will have to use two postage stamps. Your ballot must be mailed (and postmarked) no later than Election Day.
  • You, your guardian, or a near-relative can return your ballot to your local County Board of Elections.

Congratulations! You just voted!

If you think your rights were violated, report it.

 

Steps to Vote in Person

You have the right to vote in person!

(But first, you must be registered.)


Step 1:

Be informed!

  • Get a sample ballot so you know what candidates and issues are on the ballot.
  • Learn about the candidates' views on disability issues and other issues you care about.

Step 2:

Find out when you can vote.

  • Election Day - The polls will be open from 6:30 am to 7:30 pm. Poll workers have to let you vote as long as you are in line by 7:30!
  • Early Voting Period. All counties are required to have early voting. For the most updated election information, see our elections page.
    • Find the early voting locations in your county and when they are open. If an early voting site is not open when it is supposed to be, report it!
    • You must be allowed to register to vote at the Early Voting site if you are eligible but are not already registered. (You cannot register on Election Day.) If someone won't let you to register during Early Voting, report it!
    • When you register, you should provide your Voter Registration number (if you have one), Driver's License number, or the last 4 digits of your social security number. If you do not know any of these, bring a photo ID or something like a utility bill or pay stub that has your name and address instead. If someone still won't let you to register, report it!
  • Stay tuned on our election news page to make sure you know about any changes to North Carolina's voting laws.

Step 3:

To vote on Election Day, find your polling location.


Step 4:

Go to your polling location.

  • Polling locations must be accessible to people with disabilities, both on Election Day and during Early Voting. This includes having curb-side voting and at least one working accessible voting machine set up and ready for you when you arrive.
  • Curbside voting (voting from a car) is available at every voting site, including Early Voting sites, and should be clearly marked in the parking lot. You can vote curbside if you cannot vote inside without assistance due to age or physical disability. Being unable to stand or wait in line is a valid reason. You do not have to "try and fail" at voting inside before you are allowed to vote curbside.
  • If your polling location is not accessible, report it!

Step 5:

Get your ballot.

  • You DO NOT need to show a photo ID to vote!
    • However, if you did not provide your Voter Registration number, Driver's License number, or the last 4 digits of your social security number when you registered to vote, and this is your first time voting, you will have to bring photo ID or something like a utility bill or pay stub that has your name and address.
  • You are allowed to communicate with poll workers non-verbally, in writing, or with assistance.
  • If your rights have been violated, report it!

Step 6:

Fill out your ballot.

  • You can fill out your ballot by yourself. No one can tell you who to vote for!
  • If your disability makes it more difficult to fill out a ballot, almost anyone help you vote if you want. It could be a friend, family member, support worker, or poll worker. The only people who can't help you are your employer or your union (if you belong to one).
  • The North Carolina State Board of Elections sent to every county in the state this guidance on how poll workers must interact with voters with disabilities. You may want to print this out and bring it with you.

Step 7:

Turn in your ballot.


Congratulations! You just voted!

If you think your rights were violated, report it!

 

Vote In a Facility

You have the right to vote from a facility, such as a nursing home, hospital, adult care home, or psychiatric facility!

If you live in a facility and will not be able to get out to vote by yourself, see if facility staff or someone you know can take you to vote in person.

Otherwise, you can use an absentee ballot to vote. (Of course, you have to register to vote first.)


Next Steps...

Learn about upcoming Elections!  You can learn what types of elections are coming up and read through accessible voter guides right here!